5 THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW ABOUT WEIGHT TRAINING


Most people avoid weight training because they fear they’ll become too muscular in appearance. Others, on the other hand, simply don’t see the benefit. The advantages of weight training go beyond just building muscles, it also is a great way to improve overall health. Here are 5 things you might not know about weight training:

1. Stronger core results in better posture

 

It is important to have good postural muscles to help maintain a good posture. Core stability muscles, or postural muscles, are the deep muscles in your abdomen, pelvis and back. These muscles work together to produce maximum stability in the abdominal and lumbar (lower) back region, as well as coordinate the movement of the arms, legs, and spine. They act as a scaffolding holding you together.

 

2. Free weights activate more muscles than machine weights

 

Free weights generally require muscles other than those in the target muscle group to stabilize the weight when you move it.With machines, the weighted path is restricted and controlled by the formation and composition of the machinery. In effect, fewer muscles are required during the lift, pull, or push.

 

3. About 60% of people who weight train get an average of 7 hours or more of sleep per night

 

Weight training comes with other bonuses, too. Weight training has been proven to improve the quality of a person’s sleep.

 

4. It’s difficult to increase muscle while losing fat

 

Though not impossible, but it is unlikely that you can lose body fat and increase muscle at the same time. The body does not deal well with contradictory metabolic phases— losing and gaining.

 

5. Weight training can stop, prevent, and reverse muscle loss

 

When it comes to muscle: use it, lose it or build it! Resistance training is the most direct way to increase muscle mass and prevent its loss. When performing resistance exercises, the tension on your muscle fibers results in growth signals that lead to increased strength. A study of 57 adults aged 65–94 showed that performing resistance exercises three times per week increased muscle strength over 12 weeks.

 

 



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